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Showing posts with label Bangalore Weekend. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Bangalore Weekend. Show all posts

The Lepakshi Temple - Poetry on Stones

At times when airlines inform you well in advance about your flight getting late, but you might have already started moving towards airport, what will you do in such a situation?
You have 2 options; interesting one is to continue to airport, enjoy food and drinks at airport lounges, have a jolly good time and relax. And boring option will be to start searching for any on the way attraction and wear out yourself. It happened to me when, I was already on way to Bangalore from Vijaynagar. To decide, I opted for the boring option to explore Lepakshi, a small village in Anantpur district of Andhra Pradesh which was 15 km from the highway.

After accounting remaining travel time, I had precisely 2.5 hours to spend at Lepakshi. Lepakshi as pronounced locally is the place where king of bird “Jatayu (जटायु)” left this mortal world, in arms of lord Ram. There after Lord Ram requested heaven to accept Jatayu by saying "Le-Pakshi" (take the bird) and that is how, we now know the place as Lepakshi.
This small village is house to one of the most amazing architectural wonder in India, perhaps in the world, the Veerbhadra Temple with hanging pillar. I knew that I was about to step into a wonderland, the moment I took the first step inside the sacred premises. 

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Anjaneya Parvat - Birth place of Lord Hanuman

Off late Vijaynagar had become a 2nd home, have been visiting it almost every 2nd week. While one of these visits got 3-4 hours break from my schedule, so thought of making use of these 3-4 hours. I knew of a hill top temple at Anjaneya Parvat, place believed to be birth place of Lord Hanuman.  So called up the taxi driver and asked if can do Anjaneya Parvat in 3-4 hours? Driver told yes, but slightly tough, Vow decision was taken and I was on my way to Anjaneya temple well before the first ray of sunlight.


Locally known as Anjaneyadri hill, this place is believed to be the birthplace of Lord Hanuman (the most powerful of the Gods). Nearby attractions like Pampa Lake, Rishimukh Parvat reinforces the connection of this place with the time of Ramayana. Lord Hanuman is also known as Anjaneya, that’s why the name of the hill as Anjaneya Parvat. 

Hanuman temple at the top of the hill is the main attraction here. However, you need to climb 575 stairs in order to reach the summit. Check out the way to hilltop temple.

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Shri Krauncha Giri, Kumar Swamy Temple - Chalukya Legacy

Whether you are travelling on the road or off the road, you are never far off from a wonderful Offbeat Spot. Such is the beauty of Land called India. 


The era of Vijayanagara empire has been often called as the most prosperous region ever to have happened, on this earth. Other than the majestic Hampi Kingdom, this region also has some impressive monuments which are yet to be explored. While meandering in this region came to know about a panoramic temple on Krauncha Giri (Giri means Hill in hindi language), somewhere nearby.

Search for that exclusive temple took me to the Swamimalai Forest Range, wherein lies the legendary Krauncha Giri mountain. I had no idea that I was going to walk into a legendary chapter of our Mythology. Legendary…?


Located 10 km away from Sandur in Bellary district, this mountain is the site of the famous Kumar Swamy temple (also spelled as Kumaraswamy/ Kumaraswami). The Kumar
Swamy Temple complex consists of 2 temples dedicated to Lord Karthikeya and Goddess Parvati (Mother of Lord Karthikeya). Lush green mountains in the backdrop make a perfect canvas for this temple.


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St. Mary's Island, Malpe-Udupi

We have spent the entire first half of the day, praying in some of the amazing temples of Udupi. After having local Mangalorean style lunch, we were all geared up for the Malpe Beach and the St. Mary’s Island.


6 km. from Udupi town, Malpe is a natural port, one of the major fishing harbours in Karnataka and above all is home to peaceful beaches. Malpe Beach is one of less explored places and off late have started offering water sport and other adventure activities for visitors.


Blue green water on one side, green trees on other side and in between option of long walks along the coast. Settings and ambience make this place a perfect definition for heavenly place. Malpe Beach is one of most happening places in and around Udupi.

Apart from the settings, the biggest attraction here is the St. Mary’s Island which is approx. 6 km. from the coastline. Originally this island is known as Parashuram Dweepa. And taking a ferry is the only way of getting to this island. Sit relaxed in a ferry, bring your camera to action mode and enjoy the cool breeze of Arabian Sea.


To avoid glare from the sea water, may use a good sunglass. Along the way you will come across many ferries with excited souls on way to St. Marys Island.

Ferry operator gave us 1 hour (60 minutes) for the island sightseeing. At first glance it looked like more than enough as the island covers an area about 500 m. x 100 m. only. However very soon we were about to realize that 60 minutes will pass in a flash as one of the most amazing time of our lives. Welcome to St. Mary’s Island.

Legend says that in the year 1498, Vasco da Gama, first landed at St. Mary's Islands on his journey from Portugal, named one of these islands, O Padrão de Santa Maria, dedication to Mother Mary, before proceeding to Kozhikode in Kerala. Looks like it is from this that the islands got their current name. Did not knew that we were going to a part of time travel?


Distinct and gorgeous rock formations is the first thing to be noticed as soon as ferry is about to touch the St. Mary’s Island coast. Actually, these rock formations are all basaltic rock formations.

Scientific studies suggest that the basalt of the St. Mary's Islands was formed by sub-aerial sub-volcanic activity. At that time Madagascar was attached to India and Madagascar rifted apart around 88 million years ago.

Taking camera is allowed inside the island premises after paying prescribed Fee of INR 200, else you can deposit the camera in the designated counter and let your mobile capture the stunning natural landscapes.

Prominently covered with coconut trees, the island is also called Coconut Island. There is no habitation on the islands.


At certain places rock formations are so unique that you will forget your beach activities and will turn in to a Geologist.

Likewise, the northernmost island has a hexagonal basaltic rock formation, the only one of its type in India.

The beach here is also a heaven to the seashell collectors. Collect seashells of various shapes and sizes littered along the coast. My kid had collected so many shells that I had to carry them in my pockets and then inside one compartment of my camera case.


However, you will not be able to test your swimming skills as there is very less sand on the beach and the beach it is crafted with basaltic rocks all around. Security guards have been deployed around the beach to check any extra adventurous souls.


Also, there is a small eatery on the island. Please be informed that littering on the island is strictly prohibited and officials keep a vigil for enforcement of the rule. Regular ferry service (Rs. 300 per head) ply from Malpe Beach, however frequency depends upon number of passengers. Despite getting crowded with many people in the afternoon, the Malpe Beach is extremely neat and clean. White sandy Maple Beach is quickly getting popular with those who are seeking solace with some adventures.

Buses ply regularly from the Udupi town to Malpe Beach. If you have time and want to explore the nearby areas, we suggest to hire a taxi as there are many spots like Malpe Fish Market, Delta Beach, Kemmannu Hanging Bridge and others to be explored and enjoyed. 


Do you know:

1.    The St. Mary’s Islands are one of the four geological monuments in Karnataka state and declared as one of the 26 Geological Monuments of India declared by the Geological Survey of India in 2001. The monument is considered an important site for "Geo Tourism".

2.   Malpe is the first and only Indian beach with a 24/7 WiFi and also has a luggage counter to store your luggage.

3.     Malpe Beach is also a centre for numerous beach side concerts and festivals organised in Udupi.

Keep travelling Guys

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Coimbatore, Gateway to the Bliss...

Coimbatore is 2nd largest city in Tamil Nadu and one of the major industrial centers in this state. With these statistics any hopes of good sightseeing should have been effectively dropped. However, smoke filled environment and traffic jams were not in my destiny as I came across a well-planned beautiful city.
 
During my stay here, I came to know about lot of beautiful temples in and around Coimbatore and therefore a real temple run was on the cards.

15 km. from Coimbatore and situated in lush green hilly surroundings is the Marudhamalai temple, dedicated to Lord Murugan. It was twilight when I reached the temple, which is actually the best time to see the hazy ambience created by the blue skies and the hills. Situated on a hilltop, temple rises like a mirage to surround over the landscapes.

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Hampi...Land of Grand Temples

Continued from where we left at Hampi, Hemkuta Hill:


As further described by Abdur Razzek: Vijaynagar is built in such a manner that seven citadels and the same number of walls enclose each other. Around the first citadel are stones of the height of a man, one half of which is sunk in the ground while the other half rises above it. These are fixed one beside the other in such a manner that no horse or foot soldier could boldly or with ease approach the citadel." 


Razzaq describes the outer citadel as a "fortress of round shape, built on the summit of a mountain, and constructed of stones and lime. It has very solid gates, the guards of which are constantly at their post, and examine everything with severe inspection." Seventh fortress is the innermost of all and most protected as it used to serve as King’s residence."


"The space which separates the first fortress from the second, and up to the third fortress, is filled with cultivated fields and with houses and gardens. In the space from the third to the seventh one meets a numberless crowd of people, many shops, and a bazaar. By the king's palace are four bazaars, placed opposite each other. Above each bazaar is a lofty arcade with a magnificent gallery, but the audience-hall of the king's palace is elevated above all the rest. The bazaars are extremely long and broad." 

Thinking and deliberating on the magnificence of this place, we were now on the legendary Hemkuta Hill, it was the time to see and experience the large number of temples, archways and pavilions. The whole hill was fortified with tall wide stonewalls, the ruined remains of which can be seen till today. Hemkuta hill with reasonably flat expanse is one of the ideal places in Hampi to cherish the sunrise and sunset. 


According to the prevailing myth, once Lord Shiva was so impressed by the dedication of a local girl "Pampa" for him that he agreed to marry her. The occasion was celebrated by the Gods and it rained gold on this hill, which gave the present name to this hill (Hema in Sanskrit language means Gold). Hence majority of temples here are dedicated to Lord Shiva, the major one being the "Virupaksha temple", located at north of this hill. This hilltop and its slopes offer a splendid view of the sprawling ruins site.

Virupaksha temple surrounded by small temples.

Virupaksha temple is the principal temple in Hampi and an important pilgrimage centre for the worshipers of lord Shiva. The annual festivals attract huge crowds, Virupaksha temple is equally sought after by the tourists and pilgrims. It believed that this is the oldest functioning temple in India, as this temple has been functioning continuously ever since its inception in the 7th century AD. Virupaksha temple has been beautifully carved with numerous images of Gods and Goddesses.


One can reach the main entrance of temple through the chariot street in front of the Hampi Bazaar, just next to where the local bus stand. From the ticket counter close to the main entrance buy the entry ticket (Rs. 5), camera ticket (Rs. 50) and video camera fee (Rs 500). What an amazing piece of architecture? 

Virupaksha temple from inside: 

From the inner sanctum:
There is a long market outside Virupaksha temple and a number of bouldered structures, all in stones. Looks like once it has been a double story market.

This huge structure of monuments is located opposite to Virupaksha temple. I do not know what it was, but the sheer colossal size is amazing:

Next destination is the temple which even Lord Vishnu found too grand to his use and returned to live in his own home. yes we are talking of the most grand monument in Hampi, Vittala temple. the present look of the temple is attributed of Krishna Devaraya, the most acclaimed ruler of Vijayanagara dynasty. Temple complex is so big that it has shrines, pavilions and many halls located inside it. The famous "Stone Chariot", face of Karnataka tourism belongs to this temple.
Intricately carved Pillars                                                                                        Musical Pillars

The major attraction of this temple are the 56 musical pillars of Ranga Mantapa, one main pillar surrounded by a set of minor pillars. Pillars are called as "SAREGAMA" pillars courtesy to the musical notes emitted by them. Every main pillar is surrounded by 7 minor pillars. These 7 pillars emit 7 different musical notes of representative musical instruments. Sound quality depends on the type of instrument, whether wind, string or percussion type of musical instrument. These musical notes coming from the pillars has been a mystery to the people around the world. Even the 2 pillars were cut by then british rulers of India to solve this musical mystery. However, nothing was found inside the pillars and the secret is still unknown. The 2 cut pillars can still be seen in the temple. These pillars are a true testimony to the technological acumen of those times.

 

Rightly said the brilliance of this era will never be seen again ever. The aura of this place cannot be described in words, let’s hear the story from the stunning structures: 






Not only the huge structures, even the roofs are also delicately carved. Now the floodlights illuminate the Vittala temple complex and offers a majestic view of the complex. Purandaradasa Festival held annually in the month of February Attracts visitors from far off places. Hampi is a place where you can wander tirelessly for days, you will surely fall in love with the rocks. I was left spell bound.

Though in ruins now, but the aura is still intact for these monuments.

The Lotus Palace:

All of these were gradually reduced to ruins as the Empire fell to the foreign invaders in 1565 after the Battle of Talikota and this beautiful region was mercilessly plundered. Indeed one of the biggest losses to the civilizations, “Lost was a city, a region the brilliance of which will never be seen again in future”. Hampi has been declared as a World Heritage site by UNESCO. Ruins still held their esteem and provide glimpses into the prosperity this place has seen.


57 Km. from Hampi is an another architectural marvel, Kumar Swamy Temple dedicated to Lord Karthikeya. This temple was built by Chalukya dynasty and later rebuilt by Rashtrakutas. 

To reach Hampi:
Nearest railhead is Hospet, 13 km away and Toranagallu station, 25 Kms. There are about 10 daily trains and about 5 special trains to the station, which ply once or twice a week. From Bangalore, Hampi Express is the best option.
Nearest Airport is Bangalore, around 350 Km. from Hampi
Hampi is well connected by roads to almost every nearby city.

Keep travelling Guys...
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Hampi - Majestic ruins of the lost era...

The city is such that the pupil of eye has never seen a place like it and the ear of intelligence has never been informed that there existed anything to equal it in the world

- wondered by a traveller, Abdur Razzak from Persia who visited the Vijayanagara  in 1443 AD.


"Roses are sold everywhere and are an intricate part of life of people here, as necessary as food. Each strata of society/ class has shops adjacent to one another; the jewellers sell pearls, rubies, emeralds, and diamonds. In this agreeable locality, as well as in the king's palace, one sees numerous running streams and canals formed of chiseled stone, polished and smooth." This show cases the heights of equality the society has achieved where each profession was duly respected without any discrimination.


With awesome landscape along the banks of Tungabhadra River, Hampi was the capital of mighty Vijayanagara kingdom. The era of Vijayanagara empire has been often called as the most prosperous region ever to have happened on this earth. The Vijayanagara kings were great patrons of art and made Hampi flourishing centre of Indian culture.


There were opulent palaces, marvelous temples, massive fortifications, baths, markets, aqua ducts, pavilions, stables for royal elephants and elegant pillars. The word "Grand" seems too small in this region. To begin with, check out one of the important ceremonial structures of royal use: 


Above structure, Mahanavami Dibba or Dasara Dibba was constructed by Krishnadevaraya after his victory on Udaigiri. This platform was used by royals to watch "Mahanavami Festival", "Dussehra Festival", army march past and any procession. This GRAND, three tiered 8-metre-high stone platform is located to the northeast of the royal enclosure. Built in granite in 16th century AD, the platform is nearly 35 sq mts and has steps on the East, West, and South. Platform has sculptures depicting the socio-cultural activities of the time in the typical Vijayanagara style of architecture. Get ready to explore Hampi.


45 minutes’ drive from Toranagallu (35 Km.) took us to Queen’s Palace, a palace where royal ladies used to take bath. This is the first spot in line to Hampi exploration...


From outside it looked like a palace, where once water filled trenches all around the structure with fiery crocodiles used to ward off any unwanted invaders.
Few yards ahead is the Prasanna Virupaksha or Underground Shiva Temple: As the name suggests, this temple was constructed below the ground level.

The roof top of the temple is almost matching the ground level (check the ground level on the other side of this temple), due to which the sanctum and the inner side of the temple is always flooded with water. Reasons for such a construction are still unknown. Prevailing legends say that there is a hidden water source beneath the temple. During monsoon season water level rises in the temple. When the water level recedes below a certain level, a further down cellar room becomes visible, however whom so ever has tried to go inside that room has never been seen again. As per the myth there resides a big snake which is protecting the temple. Guys, enter at your own risk.


The temple was buried for over 400 years before it was discovered in the 1980’s. Looks like this the private temple of the Royal family members for their private ceremonies, as it is very near to noblemen’s quarters.


Few steps ahead ahead Hazara Rama Temple:

The Hazara Rama Temple is a significant spot in Hampi. It was once the private temple of the kings and the royal family of the Vijayanagara Empire. The reigning deity of the temple is Lord Rama. The temple is known for its relics and panels that depict the story of Ramayana.  

Only a few steps and few minutes in Hampi and I have been completely floored by the unique charm of this place. Next spot in line is Henkuta Hill and the amazing world of temples here. Just below the Hemkuta hill is the Laxmi-Narsimha temple. Carved out of granite stone in 1528 AD during the reign of Krishna Deva Raya, this 6.7 metre statue still retains its original charm. Lord Narsimha is seated on divine snake "Adishesh" which is also forming the hood over the head of Lord Narsimha. Observe this statue, one can see a feminine hand on the left part of the torse. As told by localites it is the hand of Goddess Laxmi.


This beautiful statue was vandalized and broken by the invaders in 1565 AD, broken portions are still visible. But the glow in the eyes of Lord Narsimha is still intact.

Adjacent to Laxmi Narsimha temple is Badavilinga-temple: Legend has it that this was commissioned by a peasant woman and hence the name (Badva means poor in local tongue). Base of this Shivlinga is always under water.


Walking a few steps on Hemkuta Hill, it was the time to pray at Sasivekalu Ganesha Temple.
Bouldered temple                                                                                         Lord Ganesha Statue with snake tied around Belly

Lord Ganesha'a love for food is widely admired. As per the legends one fine day, Lord Ganesa ate so much that his tummy was about to explode. To save his tummy, he just caught a snake from the ground and tied it around his stomach to prevent his tummy from bursting. Snake tied around his tummy is visible in the statue.


Just in front of Sasivekalu Ganesha shrine you can see a huge site map of Hampi installed by the archaeology department.  


Moving ahead we are on Hemkuta hill, the best place in the region to watch Sunset and the amazing world of temples. Hemkuta hill is a paradise for art lovers, numerous structures are carved out of beautiful images of Gods and Goddesses.

No doubt the times of Vijaynagar empire was the golden times for art and culture which flourished in every part of this place.
Temples to be continued...

To reach Hampi:
  • Nearest railhead is Hospet, 13 km away and Toranagallu station, 25 Kms. There are about 10 daily trains and about 5 special trains to the station, which run once or twice a week. From Bangalore, Hampi Express is the best option.
  • Nearest Airport is Bangalore, around 350 Km. from Hampi
  • Hampi is well connected by roads to almost every nearby city. Staying options are available at Toranagallu or Hampi.
If you decide to reach Hampi by road, you can witness some beautiful Emu rearing farms in the way, check out:
Keep travelling Guys...
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Dudhsagar Falls - THE MILKY WAY

Dudhsagar Falls aka Sea of Milk- a beautiful tie-red waterfall located on the Mandovi River in the Indian state of Goa on Goa's border with Karnataka state is the place I have been wanting to embark in my travel list since a long time.

 

Dudhsagar derives its name from the clouds of foam that form at the waterfalls.

 

According to the legend, a powerful king who ruled the Western Ghats had his palace in the forest. The king's daughter used to bath in the picturesque lake. She would have a jug full of sugared milk after the bath.


Once while she was just having her milk after a bath, a handsome prince saw her. Embarrassed, the princess poured milk in front of her so that it could form a curtain while one of the maids rushed to get her the dress. Since then, the sugared milk (Dudh) poured by the princess is believed to be flowing in torrents as a tribute to the modesty of the princess.

 

All you need is a weekend to cover this lovely place if you stay in Bangalore. One fine day, all of a sudden, we booked train tickets from Bangalore to Londa Junction in Rani Chenamma Express for next day travel. Around 8 AM, we reached Londa Junction and indeed that small station surprised us with its beautiful and breath freshening view.

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Kodaikanal - Gift of the Forest

I have been staying in Bangalore for the last two years, working day in and day out. Off late was feeling too much cramped by not being able to enjoy at all. This was the time I came across articles posted on this site, Travel Diaries and thanks to the posted articles, I started believing that for a small trip all we need is a decision and a weekend. As there are a lot of places to explore near to Bangalore, so I discussed my plans with some of my friends. What I realized they also had same opinion about me and were planning to go out for some time.

Four was the company for us and one fine evening we packed our bags and boarded a late night bus to "Kodaikanal". We had whole travel plan in our mind that we will have our first stop in Kodaikanal where we had to take permission from the District Forest Officer to enter the forest for trekking but were unaware of the little obstacles we may face in-between.

We had little hint that Kodaikanal may give a feeling of a hill station but never imagined that it would welcome us with somewhat like below.


The scenic beauty made us believe that it is going to be one of the best Independence Day celebrations. We had a limited time of 3 days with us to explore whatever we could have and it takes more than 2 days to trek till Munnar Top Slip.
On the outskirts of Kodaikanal, our bus had a pit stop at a highway roadside hotel. We had a delicious South-Indian breakfast and as expected it was "VOWWW".

On reaching Kodaikanal, we straight away rushed to District Forest Office (DFO) to seek permission for trekking to Munnar. We were with our full spirits when we arrived at DFO but it had something weird in its box for us.

Government officials simply rejected our request to enter the forest by saying ‘It’s dangerous to trek in this season due to some internal problems in that area’. As it was our Independence day so we could not get District Forest Officer to talk and convince him to grant the permission. Waited and kept argued for 3 hours but their response was same and finally we decided to step back and search for a good decent hotel keeping one thing in mind ‘Lets Live today and Fight tomorrow’.

Kodaikanal is a small town with lot of staying options suitable to all budgets. Luckily we got a very good place managed by Tamil Nadu Government itself with easily affordable price of 500/- per room. Rooms were really clean and surroundings were AWESOME.

We had complete half day with us so we just moved out to explore the city after having an economical & hygienic lunch in the HOTEL itself. The moment we stepped out of our hotel we saw many tourists cycling on the roads so without wasting a second we went to a nearby cycle shop and grabbed four cycles on rent.


Cycling after a long time was an extraordinary experience and we were feeling like kids again. We cycled around 5 km. to very a popular and beautiful place called ‘CROAKER'S WALK’. Within no time it was evening and place started to transform into a beautiful hill station with lights glowing in night.

There was a small teashop where we had one of the best tea of our lives having unique & fresh aroma, unfortunately the teashop guy was unable to fulfil our one of the companion's request of having Bournvita instead of Tea & Coffee. After having snacks we set out to explore the place on foot, as evening was setting in we were enjoying the foggy air of the evening.

Again we had our dinner in our hotel itself and we ended our day with 100% positive attitude that we will definitely get our permission tomorrow for trekking early in the morning itself.

Day 2– We were standing at DFO at sharp 9 AM and got to know that officer will arrive at around 11 AM, this did not matter as we were prepared to wait. Finally, our long wait ended and the officer arrived. Despite sitting immediate outside the office we could not get officer's appointment and finally we had conversation with him over the mobile phone only and answer was still 'NO'. We decided to keep aside our egos and asked the same officer to suggest some better alternatives as we thought that the Forest officer is the person most knowledgeable about the Forest. By seeing our eagerness to trek, the same officer suggested us an alternate trek at Tamil Nadu, Kerala border.

We boarded a common city bus in the late evening which took around 2-3 hours to reach our destination place. We have already decided that instead of luxuries of hotel we will be pitching in the tents. So immediately after reaching our spot we starting preparing our camps & bonfire to cook some food.

It was a perfect night with 0% pollution and brightly shining stars which is a little difficult to find in city's life. While camping you can cook your own food under the blue sky; you can cook whatever you like. Naturally prepared food is always out of the league and same we experienced while having it under the dark blue sky - 'SIMPLY DELICIOUS'.

The place had plenty of Eucalyptus tree leaves which made lighting fire easy. After the dinner, our beautiful camps were waiting to serve us with a good sleep.

Day 3:
Whole beautiful nature was in front of my eyes in the morning. I was feeling rejuvenated and 6 hours of sleep seemed like a sleep of continuous 24 hours.

No doubt it was one of the wonderful mornings I saw, having said that it was also our last day of trip so we quickly geared ourselves for 6 KM trek which includes one waterfall also. I was really excited about the waterfall as I love playing with water irrespective of not knowing how to swim.

In the beginning itself we saw a tomato and garlic plantations coming our way which was quite surprising and delightful to see.


After these plantations, we came across one Mystery Rock and if taken a closer look at you will find the rocks on the upper side resemble some faces. There was something unusual about this place.

After meddling over the mysteries associated with the Mystery Rock, we again continued our trekking on the less explored path:

In our 6 km. of trekking we searched our way through the forest and lot of different trees, majority being pine trees:

In about one hour we completed the trek and reached our cherished spot, "the Waterfall". Seeing a waterfall without any crowd was amazing.


When you go there avoid removing your shoes as the place has leeches and be careful with the slippery rocks. It is hard to explain the feeling I had of being close to the nature on this calm little waterfall, you will have to experience it on your own.

It was time when we had to move and leave the place for Kodaikanal where we had to catch our bus back to Bangalore. However, it was every difficult to bid farewell to such lovely surroundings.

Standing here I was thinking that our trip could have got extended by a few days more but I was really happy in my heart that despite not getting the DFO's permission to trek we did not ended up spending time in Kodaikanal itself, but instead explored a new place which most common tourists does not do.

Finally, our much desired break was coming to an end and it was the time to say good bye to this place and start your return journey to Bangalore.

Kodaikanal is situated in Dindigul district of Tamil Nadu and is 9 hours from Bangalore by bus. The nearest Railway stations are Palani Railway Station - 64 km. north, Kodai Road Station - 80 km. south east and Dindigul Railway Junction - 100 km. east.

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